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Pathogenic bacteria
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Pathogenic bacteria

Pathogenic bacteria are those that cause disease, such as tuberculosis and leprosy, and others you'll study next. Antibiotics are medicines used to fight diseases caused by bacteria; however, its use should not be indiscriminate, ie without a prescription or for incorrect periods of time.

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Pleiotropy

A pair of genes, several characteristics Pleiotropia (from Greek, pleion = more numerous and tropes = affinity) is the phenomenon in which a pair of allele genes conditions the appearance of several characteristics in the same organism. Pleiotropy shows that the Mendelian idea that each gene affects only one trait is not always valid.
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Mendel's Laws

1 & Ordf; Mendel's Law: Law of Segregation of Factors The proof of the dominance and recessivity hypothesis in Mendel's various experiments later led to the formulation of his first law: “Each trait is determined by two separate factors in the formation of gametes, where occur in a single dose ”, that is, for each male or female gamete only one factor is
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The MN system of blood groups

Two other antigens were found on the surface of human red blood cells, called M and N. Analyzing the blood of several people, it was found that in some there was only the M antigen, in others only the N and several people had both antigens. It was then concluded that there were three groups in this system: M, N and M N.
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How genes manifest

We have seen that in some cases genes manifest themselves with very distinct phenotypes. For example, the genes for seed color in peas manifest themselves with well-defined phenotypes, with yellow or green seeds found. This well-determined gene manifestation is called discontinuous gene variation, as there are no intermediate phenotypes.
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Lethal alleles: The genes that kill

Mutations that occur in living things are totally random, and sometimes genetic varieties emerge that can lead to the death of the carrier before birth or, if he survives, before reaching sexual maturity. These genes leading to carrier death are known as lethal alleles.
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Glossary - Letter G

Genealogy - Or family tree or pedigree. It is the study of the genetic characteristics of a particular family. Genome - (1) is the simple set of chromosomes in a cell. is the set formed by only one chromosome of each type in the species studied. In humans the genome is made up of 23 different chromosomes.
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Glossary - Letter B

B1 - Vitamin B1 or thiamine. Water soluble vitamin that fights beriberi. Main sources: rice cuticle, brewer's yeast and leafy green vegetables. B12 - Vitamin B12. Water soluble vitamin comprising hydroxycobalamin cobalamines which is antineuritic and cyanocobalamin which is antianemic.
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Glossary - Letter O

Omnivore - Consumers of an ecosystem can participate in various food chains and at different trophic levels, in which case they are called omnivores. The man, for example, when eating rice, is primary consumer; when eating meat is secondary; By eating cation, which is a carnivorous fish, it is a tertiary consumer.
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Tissue Types

In vertebrate animals there are four major groups of tissues: muscle, nervous, connective (also covering bone, cartilaginous and blood) and epithelial, constituting specific subtypes that will form the organs and body systems. For example: Blood is considered a connective tissue, with diverse cells (red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and plasma (water, mineral salts and various proteins).
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The formation of bone tissue

Ossification - formation of bone tissue - can occur by two processes: intramenbranous ossification and endochondral ossification. In the first case, bone tissue gradually appears in a conjunctival, non-cartilaginous membrane. In endochondral ossification, a bone-shaped cartilage piece serves as a template for making bone tissue.
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Glossary - Letter P

P - Vitamin P or rutin. Water soluble vitamin that fights hair fragility. Main sources: leafy vegetables and legumes. Parasite - An organism that lives on or within an organism of a different species and derives its nutrition from it harmfully. Cell Wall - Relatively rigid wrap, outside the plasma membrane, present in some cell types (see also Cellulosic Wall) Cell Wall - Wrap of algal and plant cells, formed by cellulose fibers; In the existing plants a thinner wall in the young cell (primary wall), later developing a second cellulose deposit (secondary wall) Patau - See Patau syndrome.
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Muscle tissues

Muscle tissues are of mesodermal origin and relate to locomotion and other body movements, such as contraction of the organs of the digestive tract, heart and arteries. The cells of the muscle tissues are elongated and are called muscle fibers or myocytes. In their cytoplasm, they are rich in two types of protein filaments: those of actin and those of myosin, responsible for the great capacity of contraction and distension of these cells.
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Muscular system

Movement is an essential function of the body resulting from muscle contractions and relaxation. With the exception of sponges and some coelenterates, which have no muscle tissue, all other animals use muscles to move their bodies. It is thanks to the muscular contraction that animals can swim, breathe, fly, swim, move food in the digestive cavity, pump blood into blood vessels etc.
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Cardiac striated muscle tissue

It has striated myocytes with one or two central nuclei. This tissue occurs only in the heart and presents contraction independent of the individual's will (involuntary contraction). In the heart muscle this contraction is vigorous and rhythmic. These muscle cells are smaller and branched, intimately joined together by specialized and typical structures of the cardiac musculature: the intercalated discs, which make the electrical connection between all the heart cells.
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Epithelial cell specialization

The cells of epithelial tissues remain attached to each other by specialized structures, generally called cell junctions. Note these junctions in the figure below. Desmosomes One of the most important cell junctions is the desmosomes (from Greek desmos, binding, and soma, body).
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Gap or communicating junctions

Also known as nexus, gap junction, or gap junction, they are cylindrical particles that make cells come in contact with each other so that they function in a coordinated and harmonious manner. These channels allow the movement of molecules and ions directly from the cytosol from one cell to another.
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Do you have trouble recognizing people? Try the oxytocin!

Oxytocin, produced by the hypothalamus and secreted by the pituitary gland, induces contractions of the uterine muscle during labor and stimulates milk secretion. But other and eventual functions - or applications - of the hormone have been the subject of several studies. Now new research highlights its role in face recognition.
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Skeletal striated muscle tissue

Skeletal striated muscle tissue forms most of the vertebrate body musculature, forming what is popularly called meat. This musculature completely covers the skeleton and is attached to the bones, hence it is called skeletal. This type of tissue presents voluntary contraction (which depends on the individual's will).
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Plant Cell Wall Structure

The plant cell wall is made of long, sturdy cellulose microfibrils. A microfibril assembles between sixty and seventy cellulose molecules, each consisting of five hundred linearly linked glucose molecules. Cellulose microfibrils are held together by a matrix formed of glycoproteins (sugar-bound proteins) and two polysaccharides, hemicellulose and pectin.
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Plastos

Organelles formed by an envelope of two unitary membranes internally containing a matrix or stroma, where is a system of flattened saculiform membranes, the tilacoids. They originate from plastids and contain DNA and ribosomes. They are divided into three major groups: chloroplast; chromoplast and leukoplast; These, in turn, originate from very small structures, proplastids (which usually already occur in the oosphere, embryonic sac and meristematic systems).
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