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Hermaphroditism

Hermaphroditism is a still little known sexual anomaly, constituting a morphological and physiological disorder of an individual's sexual gonads, which simultaneously manifests testicular and ovarian tissue structure. From karyotype analysis it is known that this is not a genetic syndrome (mono or halosomic trisomy), related to the X or Y sex chromosomes.
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Inheritance linked to sex

Usually, cases of sex-related inheritance are classified according to the position occupied by genes in the sex chromosomes. To do so, let's divide them into regions: The homologous portion of the X chromosome has genes that correspond to the genes of the homologous portion of the Y chromosome.
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Hemophilia

It is a blood clotting disorder that lacks factor VIII, one of the proteins involved in the process, found in the plasma of normal people. Haemophiliacs have a tendency to have severe bleeding after minor injuries, such as minor injury or tooth extraction.
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Genetics

From earliest times, man became aware of the importance of male and female in the generation of beings of the same species, and that characteristics such as height, skin color, etc., were transmitted from parents to descendants. Thus, of course, a dog when she crosses a dog will originate a puppy with characteristics of a dog and never a cat.
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Glossary - Letter A

A - Vitamin A or retinol. Fat-soluble vitamin that prevents xerophytmia and hemeralopia (night blindness). Main sources: milk, butter, carrots, pepper, cod liver oil and many vegetables. Chromosome Aberration - Generically, any structural or numerical alteration of chromosomes in the cell.
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Glossary - Letter E

E - Vitamin E or tocopherol. Fat-soluble vitamin that fights sterility and is antioxidant. Main sources: lettuce, corn and peanuts. Ecology - science that studies the relationship of living beings to each other and to the physical environment. Word from Greek: oikos = house, dwelling + logos = study.
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Glossary - Letter C (part 2)

Cilliophora - Ciliates; class of protozoa whose representatives move through eyelashes. Kinetochore - See centromere. Cissiparity - Or binary division; asexual reproduction in which unicellular organisms reproduce by simply dividing the cell. Citron - See genes.
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Glossary - Letter H

H - Vitamin H or biotin. Water soluble vitamin that fights dermatitis. Main sources: leafy and green vegetables. Habitat - an environment that offers a favorable set of conditions for the development, survival and reproduction of certain organisms. The ecosystems, or part of them, in which a particular organism lives, is its habitat.
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Loose connective tissue

Loose connective tissue fills spaces not occupied by other tissues, supports and nourishes epithelial cells, involves nerves, muscles and lymphatic blood vessels. In addition, it is part of the structure of many organs and plays an important role in healing processes. It is the most widely distributed tissue in the human body.
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Glossary - Letters X / Y / Z

X - Chromosome X. Chromosome that in mammals determines the formation of female sexual characteristics. For the formation of females you need pair XX. (see Y). Xanthophyll - Yellow pigment that occurs in plants, a member of the carotenoid group. Xerophytmia - A process of dryness and ulceration of the transparent cornea of ​​the eye, usually caused by a lack of vitamin A, which can lead to partial or total blindness.
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Bone Cell Types

Bone cells are located in small cavities in the concentric layers of mineralized matrix. When young, they are called osteoblasts (from the Greek osteon, bone, and blasts, “young cells”) and have long cytoplasmic projections that touch neighboring osteoblasts.
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Histology

Histology (from Greek: hydton = tissue + logos = studies) is the science that studies biological tissues, from their formation (origin), structure (differentiated cell types) and functioning. But what is fabric? The body of a multicellular organism is made up of different cell types that specialize in performing various functions.
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Glandular epithelial tissue

Glandular epithelial tissue cells produce substances called secretions, which can be used and other parts of the body or eliminated from the body. These secretions may be: mucous membranes when thick and mucus-rich, eg serous salivary glands when fluid, aqueous, clear and rich and protein.
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Glossary - Letter R

Radicle - Part of the plant embryo that forms the root. This is usually the first part to germinate in the seed. Root - Vegetable organ derived from the embryo radidula. Its main functions are absorption, fixation, stabilization and nutrient reserve. Axial Root - Typical root of dicotyledons that will have a main axis from which the secondary roots depart.
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Blood connective tissue

Blood (originated from hemocytopoietic tissue) is a highly specialized tissue made up of some types of cells, which make up the figurative part, dispersed in a liquid medium - the plasma - which corresponds to the amorphous part. Cell constituents are: red blood cells (also called red blood cells or erythrocytes); white blood cells (also called leukocytes).
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Nerve fiber regeneration

Like heart muscle cells, neurons no longer divide after differentiation. That way, if they are destroyed, they are no longer replaced. However, neuron extensions can, within certain limits, regenerate as long as the cell body has not been destroyed.
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Intestinal lining epithelium

Internal lining of the small intestine is a good example of epithelium that specializes in absorbing nutrients and allowing them to pass from the intestinal cavity to the blood. The high absorption capacity of the intestinal epithelium is due to the fact that its cells have, in the membrane, the free edge (ie, the edge facing the intestinal cavity), many thin, elongated projections that resemble glove fingers called microvilli. .
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“Noisy” Oceans Affect Marine Animals

Noise pollution in large cities has long been the subject of many discussions about its detrimental effects on human health. More recently, the United Nations (UN) has reported its concern about increasing noise pollution at sea as well. Apparently, this pollution is affecting and endangering the survival of marine species.
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Fruit and seed formation

What are flowers for? After pollination and fertilization, the flower undergoes an extraordinary change. Of all the components that were seen before, only the peduncle and the ovary remain. Everything else degenerates. The ovary undergoes a major change, develops and now we say it has become fruit.
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Main organs of the central nervous system

Bulb The bulb (or ablonga medulla) is the organ that is in direct contact with the spinal cord, it is the nerve passageway to the organs located higher up. In the bulb are cell bodies of neurons that control vital functions, such as heartbeat, breathing rate, and blood pressure.
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